©
21slugs:


”Yo, Mr White.”

"Bitch!"

21slugs:

”Yo, Mr White.”

"Bitch!"

bienenkiste:

Elodie Antoine, 2003

bienenkiste:

Elodie Antoine, 2003

ivy-and-twine:

Industrial designer Scott Summit, of Summit ID, creates incredibly beautiful prosthetic pieces. They are created on a 3D printer, with the user’s other limbs as a point of reference, resulting in beautifully symmetric limbs.  

His philosophy of creating personal and elegant rather than mass-produced, functional pieces really shows through the grace of his work.  

Some of the more beautiful things that come out of this philosophy range from recreating a tattoo that was lost to matching a purse to looking like a piece of sport equipment: whatever is important and personal to the wearer’s life become reflected in their new prosthetic limb. 

(Listen to his Ted Talk here)


Watermelon snow, also called snow algae, red snow, or blood snow, is Chlamydomonas nivalis, a species of green algae containing a secondary red carotenoid pigment in addition to chlorophyll. This phenomenon is especially common during the summer months in the Sierra Nevada of California where snow has lingered from winter storms, mainly at altitudes of 10,000 to 12,000 feet. Compressing the snow with your boot leaves a distinct footprint the color of watermelon pulp. The snow even has a fresh watermelon scent.
Photo credit:  © Michal Renee

Watermelon snow, also called snow algae, red snow, or blood snow, is Chlamydomonas nivalis, a species of green algae containing a secondary red carotenoid pigment in addition to chlorophyll. This phenomenon is especially common during the summer months in the Sierra Nevada of California where snow has lingered from winter storms, mainly at altitudes of 10,000 to 12,000 feet. Compressing the snow with your boot leaves a distinct footprint the color of watermelon pulp. The snow even has a fresh watermelon scent.

Photo credit: © Michal Renee